Please wait...
Breast Cancer, breast cancer information, inflammatory breast cancer, breast cancer symptom, breast cancer treatment
Health Profesional Health Profesional Health Profesional
 Hi Guest!         Font    Home > Risks > Breast Cancer
Home Page Home Contact Us Contact Login / Logout Login
Breast Cancer Print this page Mail to friend(s)

Breast cancer is a feared disease. Even though lung cancer and heart disease kill more women each year, surveys show that women view breast cancer as the biggest threat to their health. But women can take steps to lower their risk. To access your Bladder Cancer Risk completely, at ScienceofLife we have produced a general questionnaire with a fair knowledge of risk Factors and related knowledge base.

Questionnaire : To estimate your risk of breast cancer, take about 2 to 3 minutes to answer some questions about your health, lifestyle and personal background. Please fill in these questions to access your risk of Breast Cancer.

1. What is your sex?  
2. What is Your Age?
Years    
3. Have you ever had any type of cancer (except  for non-melanoma skin cancer)?
4. What is your height?
Feets Inches
5. What is you weight?    
6. Do you eat 3 or more servings of vegetables a day? 1 serving is about 1 cup of raw leafy greens or ½ cup of other vegetables, raw or cooked.
7. How many servings of alcohol do you have on a typical day? One serving is a can of beer, a glass of wine or a shot of hard liquor.
8. How old were you when you started your period?
9. Are you currently taking birth control pills?
10. How many children have you given birth to?
11. How Old were you when you first gave birth?
12. Have you breastfed for a total of at least 1 year? I You have more than one child, this is the sum of  time spent breast feeding all your children.
13. Are you menopausal?
14. What's the total amount of time you've ever taken post-menopausal hormones? Post-menopausal hormones are medications to ease the symptoms of menopause
15. Have you ever had benign breast disease? Benign breast disease is a large group of noncancerous conditions of the breast that includes cysts, fibroadenomas, and hyperplasia.
16. Has your sister ever had breast cancer?
17. Has your mother ever had breast cancer?
18. Is your ethnicity mostly Jewish?

Back to top

Risk Factors: Most scientists agree that these things affect the risk of breast cancer. Some may apply to you, but others may not.

Age and breast cancer : The risk of developing breast cancer increases with age. Rates are generally low in women under 40, start to increase after 40, and are highest in those 70 and older. The average age breast cancer is found is 62.

Back to Risk Factors

Sex and breast cancer : Though breast cancer can develop in men, over 99 percent of all cases in the United States are diagnosed in women.

Back to Risk Factors

Height and breast cancer : Tall women have a higher risk of breast cancer. Scientists aren't sure why. One reason may be that tall people have more cells in their bodies, which increases the number of cells that could become cancerous. Another reason may be that tall people grow faster as children. Faster growth is linked to changes in the genetic structure (DNA) of the body's cells, eventually causing them to become cancerous. Tall women also have a higher risk of colon cancer and tall men have a higher risk of colon cancer as well.

Back to Risk Factors

Weight and breast cancer : Women who maintain a healthy weight have a lower risk of breast cancer, especially if they are post-menopausal. This is because losing weight lowers the level of estrogen in a woman's body. Estrogen is a female reproductive hormone that is released during the menstrual cycle in premenopausal women but also released by fat cells after menopause. High levels of estrogen after menopause may cause cells in the breast to become cancerous. People who maintain a healthy weight also have a lower risk of colon cancer, kidney cancer, heart disease, diabetes and stroke. And women have a lower risk of uterine cancer.

Back to Risk Factors

Vegetables and breast cancer : Women who eat at least 3 servings of vegetables a day have a lower risk of breast cancer. Vegetables contain the antioxidant vitamin A. Low levels of vitamin A are linked to breast cancer. 1 serving of vegetables is:
  • 1 cup of raw leafy greens like lettuce or spinach
  • ½ cup of other vegetables, raw or cooked
  • ½ cup of cooked beans or peas
People who eat vegetables also have a lower risk of colon cancer, lung cancer,diabetes and stroke.

Back to Risk Factors

Alcohol and breast cancer :  Women who have less than one drink a day have a lower risk of breast cancer. Alcohol may raise the level of estrogen in a woman's body. Estrogen is a female reproductive hormone mainly released during the menstrual cycle. High levels of estrogen after menopause may cause cells in the breast to become cancerous. A drink is a can of beer, a glass of wine, or a shot of hard liquor.> People who limit alcohol also have a lower risk of colon cancer, high blood pressure, and stroke. But drinking moderate amounts has benefits too. People who drink moderate amounts have a lower risk of heart disease and diabetes.

Back to Risk Factors

Age at first period and breast cancer : Women who get their first period at an early age have a higher risk of breast cancer. This is because an early period exposes a woman's body to greater amounts of estrogen over her lifetime. Estrogen is a female reproductive hormone mainly released during the menstrual cycle. High levels of estrogen can cause cells in the breast to become cancerous.

Back to Risk Factors

Age at first birth and breast cancer : Women who give birth to their first child at a late age have a higher risk of breast cancer. One reason may be that pregnancy appears to permanently change breast tissue, making it less likely to become cancerous. The later this change occurs after a woman has her first period, the more time breast cells have to become cancerous.

Back to Risk Factors

Age at menopause and breast cancer : Women who go through menopause (when regular periods stop) at a later age than usual have a higher risk of breast cancer. This is because a late menopause exposes a woman's body to greater amounts of estrogen over her lifetime. Estrogen is a female reproductive hormone mainly released during the menstrual cycle, which can cause cells in the breast to become cancerous. Women who go through late menopause also have a higher risk of uterine cancer.

Back to Risk Factors

Number of births and breast cancer : Women who have less than 2 children have a higher risk of breast cancer. This is because pregnancy changes breast tissue in a way that prevents breast cells from becoming cancerous. The fewer pregnancies a woman has, the less her breast tissue changes. Women who have less than 2 children also have a higher risk of ovarian cancer. But women who have 2 or more children have a higher risk of cervical cancer.

Back to Risk Factors

Breast feeding and breast cancer : Women who breast feed for at least one year combined over all pregnancies have a lower risk of breast cancer. This is because breast feeding changes the tissue in a woman's breasts. This change helps prevent breast cells from becoming cancerous. Women who breast feed also have a lower risk of ovarian cancer.

Back to Risk Factors

Birth control pills and breast cancer : Women have a higher risk of breast cancer while they are taking birth control pills. The link between birth control pills and breast cancer is shown in many studies, but scientists don't know why. Birth control pills can have positive and negative effects on a woman's health. If taken for at least 5 years, birth control pills can lower a woman's risk of colon cancer, uterine cancer and ovarian cancer. But while she's taking them, they raise her risk of breast cancer, heart attack and stroke. For some women, they can also cause side effects like nausea and vomiting.

WARNING : Smoking and taking birth control pills can be a deadly combination. Together, they greatly increase the risk of a heart attack and stroke. All women who smoke should quit for good as soon as possible.

Back to Risk Factors

Post-menopausal hormones and breast cancer : Post-menopausal hormones are medications that help ease the symptoms of menopause, like hot flashes and vaginal dryness. They contain hormones that are similar to the female reproductive hormones estrogen and progesterone, which the body stops making in large quantities after menopause. Women who take post-menopausal hormones for 5 or more years have a higher risk of breast cancer. This is because post-menopausal hormones raise the level of estrogen in a woman's body. Estrogen is a female reproductive hormone mainly released during the menstrual cycle. High levels of estrogen after menopause may cause cells in the breast to become cancerous. Post-menopausal hormones can have positive and negative effects on a woman's health. They can lower a woman's risk of colon cancer and osteoporosis (bone loss). But they can raise her risk of breast and uterine cancer. And, although post-menopausal hormones were once thought to lower the risk of heart disease, it is now unclear exactly how they affect the risk of the disease.

Back to Risk Factors

Benign breast disease and breast cancer : Benign breast disease is a large group of non-cancerous conditions of the breast that includes cysts, fibroadenomas, and hyperplasia. Of all the types of benign breast disease, only hyperplasia is related to breast cancer. There are two types of hyperplasia: intraductal hyperplasia and atypical hyperplasia. Intraductal hyperplasia takes place when extra cells grow along the ducts of the breast. Atypical hyperplasia takes place if these cells become abnormal. Women who have hyperplasia have a higher risk of breast cancer. This is because the extra cells within the ducts can become increasingly abnormal. But in general, hyperplasia rarely becomes cancer.

Back to Risk Factors

Family history and breast cancer Women who have a mother or sister with breast cancer have a higher risk of the disease, especially if they were diagnosed at a young age. And the risk goes up if a woman has a mother and sister with the disease. This is because a small number of breast cancers are linked to mutations in the genetic structure (DNA) of your body's cells. These mutations can be passed on from generation to generation. With many diseases, people who have a family history have a higher risk. A family history raises the risk of several cancers like bladder, ovarian, kidney and skin cancer. It also raises risk of heart disease, diabetes, bone loss> (osteoporosis) and stroke.

Back to Risk Factors

Jewish ethnicity and breast cancer : Jewish women have a higher risk of breast cancer, especially women of Ashkenazi descent. This is because they are more likely to have genetic mutations linked to breast cancer risk. Genetic mutations are inherited changes in the genetic structure (DNA) of the body's cells. They can be passed on from generation to generation.

Back to Risk Factors
Fact Analysis

What is breast cancer? Breast cancer occurs when cells in the breast grow out of control. The cells clump together and form a malignant (cancerous) tumor.

Each breast has several sections called lobes. Each lobe has smaller sections called lobules, which produce milk when a woman is breast feeding. The lobes and lobules are linked by tubes called ducts. Ducts are the tubes that carry the milk from the lobules to the nipple. The rest of the breast is mostly made up of fat.

There are two main types of breast cancer. Breast cancer that begins in the lobes and spreads to nearby tissue is called invasive lobular carcinoma. Breast cancer that begins in the ducts and spreads to nearby tissue is called invasive ductal carcinoma.

There is also a condition called carcinoma in situ, where there are abnormal cells in the breast, but they are not cancerous. Still, carcinoma in situ is a sign that breast cancer may develop at a later time. Lobular carcinoma in situ (LCIS) are abnormal cells that originate in the lobules. Ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) are abnormal cells that originate in the ducts. Most breast tumors are benign, which means they are not cancerous. Benign breast tumors are not life threatening and do not spread outside the breast.

Back to Fact Analysis

How common is breast cancer? Breast cancer is the most common cancer among women in the US, and it's more common among older women. About 180,000 American women are diagnosed with the disease each year. Breast cancer also affects a small number of men in the US. About 1,600 American men are diagnosed with the disease each year.

Back to Fact Analysis

Who is at risk of getting breast cancer? Anyone can get breast cancer (including men), but it usually strikes women over age 50. And the risk quickly goes up with age. Women who have a family history of breast cancer have a higher risk.

Back to Fact Analysis

How do you lower your risk of breast cancer?

  • Cut down on the amount of alcohol you drink.
  • Maintain a healthy weight.
  • Eat more vegetables.

A drug called tamoxifen Back to fact sheetmay also lower the risk of breast cancer, but only for women who are at high risk of the disease. Researchers are still studying its long-term effects.

Back to Fact Analysis

Who should get breast cancer screening tests? Back to fact sheetAll women over the age of 20 should get screened regularly for breast cancer. But the right screening tests mainly depend on a woman's age. Use this chart to find out which tests you should get.

 

If you are between ages 20 and 39

Get a clinical breast exam every 1 - 3 years.

If you are between ages 40 and 49

Get a clinical breast exam every year.

Women at high risk of breast cancer may need to have regular mammograms. Talk to your doctor.

If you are age 50 or older

Get a mammogram and clinical breast exam every year.

Be sure to discuss your risk of breast cancer with a doctor. If your risk is high, you may need to have mammograms more often and at an earlier age.

Back to Fact Analysis

What are the symptoms of breast cancer? Back to fact sheetBreast cancer may have no symptoms in the early stages. But as the cancer grows, the symptoms may include:

  • A lump or mass in the breast or the under arm area
  • A change in breast size, shape or color
  • A discharge from the nipple
  • A change in the feel of the skin covering the breast (the skin could become dimpled, puckered or scaly)

Some of these symptoms may be caused by other problems. Only a doctor can know for sure. If you have any of these symptoms, talk to a doctor immediately.

Back to Fact Analysis

Major Topics
Google
Please Rate This Page: How useful is this information for you?
. Comments:

About Us |Help| Home |Poll  |Site Map
Terms & Conditions |
Business Strategy | Disclaimer | Privacy Policy |Contact Us

All material on this website is protected by International Copyright Law © 1999-2017 by scienceoflife.com, Life Science Medical Center. Best viewed in IE5.0+ (1024X768) resolution. scienceoflife.com - Window To The Future of Medicine™