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Osteoporosis risk factor, osteoporosis risk, cause factor more osteoporosis risk,Osteoporosis
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This interactive tool estimates your risk of osteoporosis and provides personalized tips for prevention. Anyone can use it, but it’s most accurate for people who haven’t already experienced significant bone loss. If you’ve already lost significant bone mass, be sure to talk to your doctor about your risk. Take a few minutes to answer some questions and find out your risk. It doesn’t tell you if you'll get osteoporosis or not, but it does tell you where to focus your prevention efforts. Because the best way to fight osteoporosis is to stop it before it starts!

Questionnaire : To estimate your risk of Osteoporosis, take about 2 to 3 minutes to answer some questions about your health, lifestyle and personal background. Please fill in these questions to access your risk of Osteoporosis.

1. What is your sex?  
2. What is your age?    
Years
3. Have you ever been told you had osteoporosis or bone loss?  
4. What is your height?
 
Feets Inches
5. What is your weight (in pounds)?    
6. Are you taking oral or inhaled steroids for a medical condition?  
7. Are you taking anticonvulsants (anti-seizure medication)?  
8. Are you taking thiazide diuretics (such as hydrochlorothiazide)?  
9. Do you take vitamin D supplements or calcium + vitamin D supplements on most days?  
10. Do you smoke cigarettes?
 No, I never smoked cigarettes
 I used to smoke cigarettes, but I quit
 Yes
11. Do you walk (or do other moderate activity) for at least 30 minutes on most days, or at least 3 hours per week?  
12. Did your mother or father ever have osteoporosis, a broken hip or a spinal fracture?  
13. Do you consider yourself to be Hispanic/Latino?  
14. Which category best describes your race?  


15. Do you take a multivitamin on most days?  
16. Do you eat a fortified breakfast cereal or an energy bar on most days? Most popular breakfast cereals are fortified.  
17. Do you eat green leafy vegetables (kale, greens, spinach, broccoli, cabbage or lettuce) on most days?  
18. How many servings of milk or dairy products do you have on most days? One serving is a cup of milk, a cup of yogurt or about 1 ½ oz of cheese.  
    

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Risk factors : Most scientists agree that these things affect the risk of osteoporosis. Some may apply to you, but others may not.

Factors that increase a person's risk of osteoporosis but cannot be changed include:

Age and osteoporosis : The risk of osteoporosis increases with age. Osteoporosis can be seen at any age but is much more common in in people as they get older.

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 Sex and osteoporosis : Women have a higher risk of osteoporosis than do men, but both men and women can develop bone loss and fracture.

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Family history and osteoporosis : A person with a parent who had osteoporosis is at increased risk of developing bone loss.

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 Race, ethnicity and osteoporosis : People of all races and ethnicities develop osteoporosis. However, African Americans tend to be at lower risk than other groups.

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 Medications and osteoporosis : Some medications, like steroids and some anticonvulsants, are an important part of the treatment of diseases, but they can also cause bone loss. People who need these medications should take steps to protect their bones.

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Most risk factors for osteoporosis can be modified to reduce risk, either through lifestyle changes or through medication, if needed. These include:

Physical activity and osteoporosis : Exercise is one of the best ways to protect yourself from osteoporosis. Weight-bearing exercises that work against gravity (like walking, stair climbing and weight training) help maintain strong bones. Exercise also helps prevent other diseases such as Osteoporosis, stroke, diabetes, obesity and colon cancer. Try to get at least 30 minutes of exercise a day.

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Post-Menopausal hormones and osteoporosis : Post-menopausal hormones can contain different hormones that are similar to the female reproductive hormones, estrogen and progesterone. After menopause, a woman's body stops making these hormones in large quantities. For women who are going through (or have already gone through) menopause, post-menopausal hormones can help decrease symptoms, like hot flashes and vaginal dryness, and also protect against osteoporosis and colon cancer. The hormone estrogen is especially important in osteoporosis prevention because it can reduce bone loss and increase bone density. However, post-menopausal hormones also have some significant risks, like increasing the risk of breast and uterine cancer. And, although post-menopausal hormones were once thought to lower the risk of heart disease, it is now unclear exactly how they affect the risk of the disease.

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Tobacco smoke and osteoporosis : Smokers have a higher risk of osteoporosis than do non-smokers. Smoking may work in several ways to increase bone loss. For example, smoking can change the body's hormone levels and may interfere with calcium absorption. Tobacco exposure also increases your risk of Osteoporosis, stroke, peripheral vascular disease (narrowing of the blood vessels in the legs), emphysema, bronchitis,diabetes, and cancers of the lung, bladder,kidney, pancreas, cervix, lip, mouth, tongue, larynx, throat and esophagus. For many people, quitting smoking is the single best thing they can do to improve their health.

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Weight and osteoporosis : The risk of osteoporosis is highest in thin people with small bones and lowest in heavy people. Heavier people have a lower risk for several reasons. The extra fat most heavy people carry increases estrogen levels (which protects against rapid bone loss), puts weight-bearing stress the bone (which helps make them stronger), and can act as a cushion in case of a fall (which protects bones from fractures). While extra weight can protect from osteoporosis, it also puts extra strain on the whole body, increasing the risk of diabetes, high blood pressure, high cholesterol, Osteoporosis and stroke. Maintaining a healthy weight has been proven to decrease the risk of cancer of the colon, kidney, breast and uterus. When all this is taken together, the healthiest approach to protecting your bones is not through weight gain but through other, healthier approaches, like exercise and a healthy diet.

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Diet and osteoporosis : Diet can play an important role in bone health. To decrease your risk of osteoporosis, it is especially important to get enough calcium, vitamin D and vitamin K. Good sources of calcium include dairy products, nuts, whole grains, green leafy vegetables, and calcium supplements. Good sources of vitamin D include eggs, fatty fish, fortified dairy products and breakfast cereals, and direct sunlight (which helps vitamin D form in the skin). Good sources of vitamin K are green leafy vegetables like kale, greens, spinach, broccoli, cabbage or lettuce. Too much vitamin A, in the form of retinol, can increase the risk of osteoporosis. Try to keep retinol intake between 2500 IU and 5000 IU a day. The best way to do this is to make sure you don't consume too many foods fortified with vitamin A (check the labels). And when choosing a multivitamin, pick one that has no more than 5000 IU of vitamin A and has at least 20% of the vitamin A from beta carotene.

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Fact Analysis

What is osteoporosis? Osteoporosis is a disease in which the bones become weak and can break easily. Often people don't know that they have osteoporosis until a bone actually breaks (or fractures). Any bone can be affected by osteoporosis, but the most common bones that break are in the hip, back and wrist. The condition is quite serious because fractures can lead to pain, hospitalizations, surgery, disability and even death.

Bones are made up mostly of proteins and minerals. Two minerals that are especially important in bone are calcium and phosphorus. Bones are living tissues and old bone cells are always being replaced by new ones. There are special cells that build up new bone (osteoblasts) while other cells (osteoclasts) break down the old bone. As people get older, their bodies don't replace all the bone that has been broken down, and bones tend to become weaker and more likely to break.

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How common is osteoporosis? Over 10 million people in the United States already have osteoporosis. About 18 million others have lost some bone mass and are likely to develop osteoporosis in the future. More than 80% of those affected are women. Osteoporosis leads to over 1 1/2 million fractures each year in this country. One out of two women and one out of eight men over the age of 50 will suffer a fracture related to osteoporosis at some point during their lives.

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Who is at risk of developing osteoporosis? Anyone can develop osteoporosis, but women are at higher risk than men. In both men and women, the risk of osteoporosis goes up with age, with bone loss usually starting slowly around age 30. For men, bone loss tends to occur gradually over time, while women experience a period of heightened bone loss around menopause that then slows down again after a few years. Thin people with small bones are at the highest risk of osteoporosis. And this relates to another reason women experience higher rates of osteoporosis than men: they often simply begin with less bone mass. Of all racial and ethnic groups, African Americans tend to be at the lowest risk, but all races and ethnicities suffer from osteoporosis.

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Can osteoporosis be treated? It is best to prevent osteoporosis before it starts, and there are many steps that everyone can take to decrease the risk of bone loss. If you are at high risk of osteoporosis or are already experiencing bone loss, talk to your doctor about available treatments. There are medications that can slow the rate of bone loss and even help rebuild bone.

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How can you prevent osteoporosis? There are steps you can take to reduce your risk of osteoporosis:

  • Don't smoke
  • Get regular weight bearing exercise like dancing, walking or climbing stairs
  • Make sure you get enough calcium and vitamin D
  • Eat green leafy vegetables that contain vitamin K, like kale, spinach, broccoli and cabbage
  • Talk to your doctor to see if postmenopausal hormones are right for you

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Who should be screened? There are no good screening tests to identify people who will develop bone loss and fractures. However, if you have osteoporosis risk factors or symptoms, there are tests (like xrays and bone scans) your doctor can do to see if you've had bone loss.

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What are the symptoms? Bone loss can continue for many years without causing any symptoms, so many people with osteoporosis don't know they have it. Sometimes the first symptom is a broken bone. Vertebra (bones in the back) can break leading to pain, loss of height, or back deformities. Hip fractures can lead to pain, surgery, disability and even death. Fractures of the wrist and other bones can also lead to pain, hospitalization and disability. That's why preventing osteoporosis is important.

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