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Diabetes, diabetes symptom, diabetes care, diabetes treatment, diabetes diet
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This interactive tool estimates your risk of diabetes and provides personalized tips for prevention. Anyone can use it, but it’s most accurate for people who have never had any type of blood sugar problem. If you’ve had blood sugar problems in the past, be sure to talk to your doctor about your risk. Take a few minutes to answer some questions and find out your risk. It doesn’t tell you if you'll get diabetes or not, but it does tell you where to focus your prevention efforts. Because the best way to fight diabetes is to stop it before it starts.

Questionnaire : To  estimate  your  risk of  Diabetes, take about 2 to 3 minutes to answer some questions about your health, lifestyle and personal background. Please fill in these questions to access your risk of Diabetes.

1. What is your sex?  
2. What is Your Age?    
Years
3. Have you ever been told you had diabetes or a problem with high blood sugar?  
4. What is your height?
Feets Inches
5. What is your Weight?    
6. What is your waist size?  
7. Do you eat 3 or more servings of whole grains per day (wheat bread, whole grain pasta, brown rice, oatmeal, whole grain breakfast cereal, bran or popcorn)? A serving is one slice of bread, 1 ounce of breakfast cereal or ½ cup of cooked cereal, pasta or rice?  
8. Do you eat more than 3 servings of refined starch per day (white bread, white rice, white pasta, white potatoes or low fiber cereals like crispy rice and corn flakes)? A serving is one slice of bread, 1 ounce of breakfast cereal or ½ cup of cooked cereal, pasta or rice.  
9. Do you eat oil-based salad dressing or use liquid vegetable oil for cooking on most days?   
10. How many servings of alcohol do you have on a typical day? One serving is a can of beer, a glass of wine or a shot of hard liquor.  

11. Do you smoke cigarettes?
 No, I never smoked cigarettes
 I used to smoke cigarettes, but I quit
 Yes
12. Do you walk (or do other moderate activity) for at least 30 minutes on most days, or at least 3 hours per week?  
13. Has anyone in your immediate family (mother, father, sister, brother) had diabetes?  
14. Do you consider yourself to be Hispanic/Latino?  
15. Which category best describes your race?  


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Risk factors Most scientists agree that these things affect the risk of diabetes. Some may apply to you, but others may not.

Factors that increase a person's risk of Type 2 diabetes but cannot be changed include:

Age and diabetes : The risk of type 2 diabetes increases with age, and it is most common in people over the age of 40.

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Personal history of diabetes or high blood sugar : People who have had problems with high blood sugar in the past may be at higher risk of developing diabetes. Women who have had diabetes during pregnancy (called gestational diabetes) are also at higher risk of developing diabetes later in life.

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Family history and diabetes : A person with a close relative who had diabetes has a higher risk of developing the disease. This increased risk is probably due to a combination of shared genes and shared lifestyle factors. ]

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Race and ethnicity : Type 2 diabetes is more common in African Americans, Latinos, Native Americans, Asians and Pacific Islanders, compared to whites.

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Most risk factors for diabetes can be modified to reduce risk, either through lifestyle changes or through medication, if needed. These include:

Weight, waist size and diabetes : The risk of Type 2 diabetes goes up as body weight increases. This is especially true for people who carry extra body fat around the waist (called "apple shaped"). Extra weight affects the body's sensitivity to insulin and it also puts extra strain on the whole body, increasing the risk of heart disease, stroke, high blood pressure and high cholesterol. Maintaining a healthy weight has been proven to decrease the risk of cancer of the colon, kidney, breast and uterus.

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Tobacco smoke and diabetes : Smoking increases the risk of diabetes. Smoking can increase blood sugar levels and decrease the body's ability to use insulin. It can also change the way the body stores excess fat - increasing fat around the waist, which is linked to diabetes. The damage that tobacco chemicals do to blood vessels, muscles and organs may also increase the risk of diabetes. Tobacco exposure also increases your risk of heart disease, stroke, peripheral vascular disease, emphysema, bronchitis, osteoporosis, and cancers of the lung, bladder, kidney, pancreas, cervix, lip, mouth, tongue, larynx, throat and esophagus. For many people, quitting smoking is the single best thing they can do to improve their health.

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Physical activity and diabetes : Exercise is one of the best ways to help maintain a healthy weight, a key factor in lowering the risk of diabetes. Exercise also helps the body's cells use insulin effectively, which makes it easier to control blood sugar levels. In addition, exercise also helps prevent other diseases such as heart disease, stroke, osteoporosis, and colon cancer. Even just 30 minutes of moderate exercise (like walking) daily can decrease your risk of disease.

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Diet and diabetes : Diet can be a powerful tool for lowering the risk of diabetes. The best approach? Eat a diet that focuses on whole grains, cereal fiber, and liquid vegetable oils and limits refined starches (like potatoes and white bread).

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Alcohol and diabetes : Moderate alcohol (about one drink a day for women and two for men) has been shown to decrease the risk of diabetes compared to non-drinkers. Limited use of alcohol may also decrease the risk of developing heart disease. However, it is not recommended that non-drinkers start drinking. Alcohol use has many of its own risks like increasing blood pressure, body weight, heart failure, addiction, suicide and accidents. People who limit their use of alcohol also have a lower risk of colon cancer, and breast cancer.

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Fact Analysis

What is diabetes? Diabetes (also known as diabetes mellitus) is a condition in which the body either can't make or can't use insulin properly. Insulin is a hormone normally produced by the pancreas. Insulin is very important because it regulates the sugar level in the blood, and it allows the body to use this sugar for energy. Without enough insulin, the body's cells can't get the energy they need, the sugar level in the blood gets too high, and many problems can result. Diabetes is not curable, but, fortunately, it is treatable. There are two main types of diabetes. They are known as type 1 and type 2. Type 1 diabetes (also known as juvenile-onset or insulin-dependent diabetes) usually affects children and young adults. People with type 1 diabetes can't make insulin, so they need to take insulin shots to stay alive. Type 2 diabetes (also known as adult-onset or non insulin-dependent diabetes) is much more common than type 1 diabetes. In fact 90-95% of diabetes is type 2. This type of diabetes is more common in people who are over the age of 40 and overweight. It also tends to run in families. People with type 2 diabetes make some insulin but either it's not enough, or their bodies just aren't able to use it properly. Many people with type 2 diabetes can control their blood sugar with diet and oral medication, but some people also need to use insulin shots.

There are many complications that come from diabetes and poor blood sugar control. People with diabetes can develop nerve problems, kidney disorders, blindness, and severe infections. They also have a higher risk of coronary heart disease, stroke and certain cancers, like pancreatic and uterine cancer. Each year almost 200,000 Americans die from diabetes and its complication.

Another Type of Diabetes: Gestational Diabetes : About 3-5 % of women develop diabetes during pregnancy, called gestational diabetes. Usually a temporary condition that goes goes away after giving birth, gestational diabetes can nevertheless cause problems for both mother and baby. Some complications include certain types of birth defects, abnormally large babies, and an increased risk of caesarian section. Even if the diabetes disappears after the baby is born, women who have had gestational diabetes also have a greater risk of developing type 2 diabetes later in life.

 

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How common is diabetes? Diabetes is very common in the United States. Almost 16 million people have it, and the numbers are growing. Most people with diabetes have type 2.

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Who is at risk of diabetes? Anyone can develop diabetes, but most people that have diabetes are adults over the age of 40, and the risk increases with age. African Americans, Latinos, Native Americans, Asians and Pacific Islanders are at higher risk of developing diabetes compared to whites. Also, people who are overweight, inactive, smoke or have family members with diabetes are at a higher risk.

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How can you lower your risk of diabetes? There are things you can do to reduce your risk of developing diabetes:

  • Maintain a healthy weight
  • Get regular exercise
  • Don't smoke
  • Eat a healthy diet that focuses on whole grains and "good" fats (like olive and canola oil)

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Who should be screened? Screening for diabetes is very important because millions of people have this disease and don't know it. Everyone age 45 and older should have their blood sugar checked by a doctor at least once every 3 years. People who are at higher risk may need to be tested earlier and more often. Screening is easy with simple blood and urine tests that can have important benefits. If you find out you have the disease, you can take steps to treat it and prevent complications.

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What are the symptoms? Some people develop symptoms like strong thirst, increased feelings of hunger, frequent urination and wounds that don't heal. However, many people with diabetes have no symptoms. That is why screening is important.

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