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sign and symptom of cervical cancer, sign of cervical cancer, cervical cancer warning sign, cancer cervical early sign Cervical Cancer
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Cervical cancer used to be a leading cause of cancer death in the US. But today, it's one of the most preventable kinds of cancer. The reason? Regular screenings with a Pap smear. To estimate your risk of cervical cancer, take about 2 to 3 minutes to answer some questions about your health, lifestyle and personal background. To access your Cervical Cancer Risk completely, at ScienceofLife we have produced a general questionnaire with a fair knowledge of risk Factors and related knowlegebase.

Questionnaire : To estimate your risk of Cervical Cancer , take about 2 to 3 minutes to answer some questions about your health, lifestyle and personal background. Please fill in these questions to access your risk of Cervical Cancer . (If you've had a hysterectomy (removal of your womb), you have no risk of cervical cancer. This questionnaire doesn't apply to you.)

1. What is your sex?  
2. What is Your Age ?
 Years    
3. Do you smoke cigarettes?
Yes
No, I never smoked cigarettes
I used to smoke cigarettes, but I quit
4. How old were you when you first had sex?
5. How many sexual partners have you had in your lifetime?
6. Have you ever had a STD (sexually transmitted disease)? STDs include HPV (human papillomavirus virus), herpes, gonorrhea, chlamydia and HIV/AIDS.
7. Throughout your life, has your primary method of birth control been a condom or diaphragm?
8. How many children have you given birth to?
9. Have you had a Pap smear within the last 3 years?

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Risk factors : Most scientists agree that these things affect the risk of cervical cancer. Some may apply to you, but others may not.

Age and cervical cancer : The risk of cervical cancer goes up with age. However, because of widespread screening with Pap smear in the United States, the risk of cervical cancer stops rising around age 40, after which it remains relatively steady. The average age the disease is found in the United States is 47.

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Smoking cigarettes and cervical cancer : Women who smoke cigarettes have a higher risk of cervical cancer. Cigarette smoke contains chemicals that damage the genetic structure (DNA) of the body's cells. DNA damage causes cells to become cancerous. But after a person stops smoking, new cells replace damaged ones. People who smoke cigarettes also have a higher risk of cancers of the lung, bladder, kidney, pancreas, lip, mouth, tongue, larynx, throat and esophagus. People who smoke even have a higher risk of other diseases like heart disease, diabetes, stroke, bone loss, (osteoporosis), emphysema, and bronchitis!

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Sex at an early age and cervical cancer :  Women who have sex for the first time at an early age have a higher risk of cervical cancer. Scientists aren't sure why. One reason may be that the human papillomavirus (HPV) more easily infects a young woman's cervix. HPV is a sexually transmitted disease. Some types of HPV can cause cells in the cervix to become cancerous.

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Number of sexual partners and cervical cancer : Women who limit their number of sexual partners have a lower risk of cervical cancer. Fewer partners mean fewer chances of getting human papillomavirus (HPV). HPV is a sexually transmitted disease. Some types of HPV can cause cells in the cervix to become cancerous. Women who limit the number of their sexual partners also have a lower risk of STDs and pelvic infection.

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STDs and cervical cancer : Each year in the US, millions of Americans are diagnosed with a sexually transmitted disease (STD). The most common are chlamydia, gonorrhea, herpes, and human papillomavirus (HPV). Women who have an STD -- especially HPV -- have a higher risk of cervical cancer. Some types of HPV can cause cells in the cervix to become cancerous. Other STDs may also cause cells in the cervix to become cancerous. Women who have a STD also have a higher risk of other health problems like infertility and pelvic infection.

WARNING: If you think you have an STD, talk to a doctor immediately. STDs may be hard for you to talk about, but it's important to get treated. Most STDs are treatable if found early. 

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Condoms, diaphragms and cervical cancer : Women who use latex condoms or diaphragms every time they have sex have a lower risk of cervical cancer. These methods of birth control act as a barrier against human papillomavirus (HPV). HPV is a sexually transmitted disease. Some types of HPV can cause cells in the cervix to become cancerous. Women who use condoms or diaphragms also have a lower risk of STDs and other health problems like infertility and pelvic infection.

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Number of births and cervical cancer : Women who give birth to 2 or more children have a higher risk of cervical cancer. Scientists aren't sure why. But women who give birth to less than 2 children have a higher risk of breast cancer and ovarian cancer.

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Pap test and cervical cancer :  Women who get a Pap test regularly have a lower risk of cervical cancer. The test finds cells in the cervix that may turn into cancer. If these cells are found early, a woman can be treated before cervical cancer develops.

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Fact Analysis

What is cervical cancer? Cervical cancer is caused by a virus called human papillomavirus (HPV). HPV causes cells in the cervix to grow out of control and become cancerous. The cervix is part of the female reproductive system. It's about one inch around and connects the vagina to the uterus (womb). Sperm travels through the cervix to fertilize a woman's egg during conception.

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How common is cervical cancer? About 13,000 American women are diagnosed with cervical cancer each year.

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Who is at risk of getting cervical cancer? All sexually active women can get cervical cancer. But few women in the US get it because so many get screened. And the screening test is so effective.

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How do you prevent cervical cancer?

  • Don't smoke.
  • Get a Pap smear every 1 to 3 years. 
  • Limit the number of your sexual partners. 

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Who should be screened for cervical cancer? Beginning at age 18 or when they start having sex, all women should be screened for cervical cancer regularly. The screening test is called a Pap smear. Ask a doctor how often you should get a Pap smear. Most women get the test every 1 to 3 years. Getting regular Pap smears is the single best way to lower your risk of cervical cancer. The test can find abnormal cells, which can later be removed before they turn into cancer.

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What are the symptoms of cervical cancer? The symptoms of cervical cancer may include:

  • Abnormal bleeding from the vagina
  • Pain during sex
  • Bleeding after sex
Some of these symptoms may be caused by other problems. Only a doctor can know for sure. If you have any of these symptoms, see a doctor immediately.

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