Please wait...
Melanoma Cancer, melanoma skin cancer, non melanoma skin cancer, malignant melanoma cancer
Health Profesional Health Profesional Health Profesional
 Hi Guest!         Font    Home > Risks > Melanoma Detail
Home Page Home Contact Us Contact Login / Logout Login
Melanoma Cancer Print this page Mail to friend(s)

Melanoma is a type of skin cancer. It's the least common but also the most dangerous. Like all types of skin cancer, it's easy to prevent. Protect your skin from the sun. And be sure to help kids protect their skin. Getting bad sunburns as a child is the leading risk factor for melanoma. To access your Melanoma Cancer Risk completely, at ScienceofLife we have produced a general questionnaire with a fair knowledge of risk Factors and related knowlegebase.

Questionnaire : To estimate your risk of melanoma, take about 2 to 3 minutes to answer some questions about your health, lifestyle and personal background. Please fill in these questions to access your risk of Bladder Cancer.

1. What is your sex?  
2. What is your age?    
Years
3. Have you ever had any type of cancer (except for non-melanoma skin cancer)?  
4. Do you have naturally blonde or red hair?  
5. Do you have naturally blue, green, or hazel eyes?  
6. Do you have fair skin?  
7. Did you have severe, repeated sunburns as a child?  
8. Have you ever taken immunosuppressive drugs? Immunosuppressive drugs protect the body from infection after an organ transplant.  
9. Has your brother, sister or parent ever had melanoma?  
                                          

Back to top

Risk factors : Most scientists agree that these things affect the risk of melanoma. Some may apply to you, but others may not.

Age and melanoma : The risk of melanoma goes up with age, yet it tends to develop earlier in life than many other cancers. The average age at diagnosis is 57.

Back to Risk Factors

Physical features and melanoma : People who have light-colored hair, light-colored eyes, or fair skin have a higher risk of melanoma. This is because people with these features often have low levels of pigment in their skin and are more likely to get sunburned. Pigment gives skin its color. High levels of pigment make skin darker and help protect it from the sun. Sunlight can cause skin cells to become cancerous.

Back to Risk Factors

Sunburns and melanoma : People who have severe, repeated sunburns as children have a higher risk of melanoma. This is because sunburns in childhood can cause skin cells to become cancerous later in life. Sunburns as an adult also raise the risk of skin cancer.

Back to Risk Factors

Immunosuppressive drugs and melanoma :People who've taken immunosuppressive drugs have a higher risk of melanoma. After an organ transplant, these drugs prevent the body from rejecting the new organ. But they also prevent the body from responding to cell growth. This means that when a person is taking them, their skin cells can grow out of control and become cancerous.

Back to Risk Factors

Family history and melanoma : People who have a mother, father, brother, or sister with melanoma have a higher risk of the disease. This is because some cases of melanoma are linked to mutations in the genetic structure (DNA) of the body's cells. These mutations can be passed on from generation to generation. With many diseases, people who have a family history have a higher risk. A family history raises the risk of several cancers like lung, breast, prostate, colon, bladder, uterine, ovarian, kidney, stomach, pancreatic and other types of skin cancer. It also raises the risk of diabetes, bone loss (osteoporosis) and stroke. 

Back to Risk Factors

Fact Analysis

What is melanoma? Melanoma is a type of skin cancer. It's the least common but also the most dangerous. It begins in skin cells called melanocytes. Melanocytes grow in groups and form moles. Most moles are not cancerous. But when melanocytes grow out of control, they become melanoma. Melanoma accounts for 4% of all skin cancer. The other types of skin cancer are called basal cell cancer and squamous cell cancer. They are less dangerous than melanoma because they are highly curable. The skin is the body's biggest organ. It protects us against sunlight, injury and infection. It also regulates body temperature. It has 2 main layers: the outer layer (epidermis) and the inner layer (dermis).

Back to Fact Analysis

How common is melanoma? About 47,000 Americans are diagnosed with melanoma each year. About 1.3 million Americans are diagnosed with other types of less serious skin cancer.

Back to Fact Analysis

Who is at risk of getting melanoma? Anyone can get melanoma. The risk usually goes up with age. And people with light-colored hair, eyes and skin have a higher risk than people with darker coloring. People with a family history of melanoma also have a higher risk.

Back to Fact Analysis

How do you prevent melanoma?

  • Protect your skin from the sun.
  • Be sure to protect the kids in your life as well.
Kids need extra protection from the sun because their skin is more likely to burn. Be an example for them to follow.

Back to Fact Analysis

What is the screening test? There is no good screening test for melanoma. But you can check your skin for signs of an unusual mole or changes in a mole you've had for a long time. If you're concerned about melanoma, talk to a doctor about your risk.

Back to Fact Analysis

What are the symptoms of skin cancer? The main symptom of melanoma is an unusual mole. Signs of an unusual mole are:

  • It changes in size, shape, or color
  • Half of the mole does not look like the other half
  • The edges of the mole are uneven, ragged, or notched
  • The mole is not evenly colored.
  • The mole has different shades of tan, brown, or black and may have patches of red, blue, or white
  • The mole is wider than a quarter of an inch – about the width of a pencil eraser
Most moles are normal and harmless. A normal mole is usually an evenly colored black, tan, or brown spot that does not change size or shape. If you have an unusual mole or notice a change in a mole you've had for a long time, see a doctor immediately.

Back to Fact Analysis

 

Major Topics
Google
Please Rate This Page: How useful is this information for you?
. Comments:

About Us |Help| Home |Poll  |Site Map
Terms & Conditions |
Business Strategy | Disclaimer | Privacy Policy |Contact Us

All material on this website is protected by International Copyright Law © 1999-2017 by scienceoflife.com, Life Science Medical Center. Best viewed in IE5.0+ (1024X768) resolution. scienceoflife.com - Window To The Future of Medicine™