Please wait...
Uterine Cancer, cancer symptom uterine, cancer sign uterine, cancer surgery uterine, cancer sign symptom uterine
Health Profesional Health Profesional Health Profesional
 Hi Guest!         Font    Home > Risks > Uterine Cancer
Home Page Home Contact Us Contact Login / Logout Login
Uterine Cancer Print this page Mail to friend(s)

Uterine cancer and endometrial cancer mean the same thing. This is because most uterine cancer starts in the endometrium (the inner lining of the womb). After, breast cancer, it is the most common cancer of the female reproductive system. To access your Uterine Cancer Risk completely, at ScienceofLife we have produced a general questionnaire with a fair knowledge of risk Factors and related knowlegebase.

Questionnaire : To estimate your risk of uterine cancer, take about 2 to 3 minutes to answer some questions about your health, lifestyle and personal background. Please fill in these questions to access your risk of Uterine Cancer.

1. What is your sex?  
2. What is your age?    
Years
3. Have you ever had any type of cancer (except for non-melanoma skin cancer)?  
4. What is your height?
Feets Inches
5. What is your weight?    
6. Do you smoke cigerattes?
 No, I never smoked cigarettes
 I used to smoke cigarettes, but I quit
 Yes
7. What's the total amount of time you've ever taken birth control pills?  
8. How many children have you given birth to?  
9. Are you menopausal?  
10. Have you ever been told that you have diabetes or a problem with high blood sugar?  
11. Has your sister or mother ever had uterine cancer?  

Back to top

Risk factors : Most scientists agree that these things affect the risk of uterine cancer. Some may apply to you, but others may not.

Age and uterine cancer : The risk of uterine cancer goes up with age. Over 90 percent of cases are diagnosed in women over 45. The average age the disease is found is 60.

Back to Risk Factors

Weight and uterine cancer :  Women who maintain a healthy weight have a lower risk of uterine cancer, especially if they are post-menopausal. Being overweight raises the amount of estrogen a woman is exposed to throughout her life. Estrogen is a female reproductive hormone mainly released during the menstrual cycle. High levels of estrogen may cause cells in the uterus (womb) to become cancerous. People who maintain a healthy weight also have a lower risk of colon cancer, kidney cancer, heart disease, diabetes and stroke. And women have a lower risk of breast cancer..

Back to Risk Factors

Smoking cigarettes and uterine cancer :  Women who smoke over a pack of cigarettes a day actually have a lower risk of uterine cancer. But smoking raises their overall risk of early death so much that it cancels out any kind of protective effect. Cigarette smoke contains chemicals that damage the genetic structure (DNA) of the body's cells. DNA damage causes cells to become cancerous. But after a person stops smoking, new cells replace damaged ones. People who smoke cigarettes have a higher risk of cancers of the bladder, kidney, pancreas, lip, mouth, tongue, larynx, throat, and esophagus. Women who smoke have a higher risk of cervical cancer. People who smoke even have a higher risk of other diseases like diabetes, bone loss (osteoporosis), emphysema and bronchitis! .

Back to Risk Factors

Birth control pills and uterine cancer :  Women who take birth control pills for at least 5 years have a lower risk of uterine cancer. The longer a woman takes the pill, the more she lowers her risk. Scientists aren't sure why. Birth control pills can have positive and negative effects on a woman's health. If taken for at least 5 years, birth control pills can lower a woman's risk of colon cancer, uterine cancer and ovarian cancer. But while she's taking them, they raise her risk of breast cancer, heart attack and stroke. When she stops taking them, her risk returns to normal. For some women, they can also cause side effects like nausea and vomiting. WARNING: Smoking and taking birth control pills can be a deadly combination. Together, they greatly increase the risk of a heart attack and stroke. All women who smoke should quit for good as soon as possible.

Back to Risk Factors

Number of births and uterine cancer :  Women who don't give birth to any children have a higher risk of uterine cancer. Never being pregnant raises the level of estrogen and lowers the level of progesterone in a woman's body. Estrogen and progesterone are female reproductive hormones. High levels of estrogen combined with low levels of progesterone may cause cells in the uterus (womb) to become cancerous.

Back to Risk Factors 

Age at menopause and uterine cancer :  Women who go through menopause (when regular periods stop) at a late age have a higher risk of uterine cancer. This is because late menopause exposes a woman's body to more menstrual cycles. Estrogen is a female reproductive hormone mainly released during the menstrual cycle. High levels of estrogen may cause cells in the uterus (womb) to become cancerous. Women who go through late menopause also have a higher risk of breast cancer.

Back to Risk Factors

Post-menopausal hormones and uterine cancer : Post-menopausal hormones are medications that help ease the symptoms of menopause, like hot flashes and vaginal dryness. They contain hormones that are similar to the female reproductive hormones estrogen and progesterone, which the body stops making in large quantities after menopause. Women who take post-menopausal hormones for 10 or more years have a higher risk of uterine cancer. This is because they raise the level of estrogen in a woman's body. Estrogen is a female reproductive hormone mainly released during the menstrual cycle. High levels of estrogen after menopause may cause cells in the uterus (womb) to become cancerous. Post-menopausal hormones can have positive and negative effects on a woman's health. They can lower a woman's risk of colon cancer and osteoporosis (bone loss). But they can raise her risk of breast and uterine cancer. And, although post-menopausal hormones were once thought to lower the risk of heart disease, it is now unclear exactly how they affect the risk of the disease.

Back to Risk Factors

Diabetes and uterine cancer :  Diabetes occurs when the body doesn't make enough insulin or when the body can't use the insulin it makes. Insulin is a hormone that converts food into energy. Women who have diabetes may have a slightly higher risk of uterine cancer. Scientists aren't sure why. One reason may be that diabetes raises the level of estrogen in a woman's body. Estrogen is a female reproductive hormone mainly released during the menstrual cycle. High levels of estrogen may cause cells in the uterus (womb) to become cancerous. People who have diabetes also have a higher risk of pancreatic cancer, heart disease and stroke.

Back to Risk Factors

Family History and Uterine Cancer :  Women who have a mother or sister with uterine cancer have a higher risk of the disease. This is because a small number of uterine cancers are linked to mutations in the genetic structure (DNA) of the body's cells. These mutations can be passed on from generation to generation. With many diseases, people who have a family history have a higher risk. A family history raises the risk of several cancers like bladder, uterine, kidney, skin cancer. It also raises the risk of diabetes, bone loss (osteoporosis) and stroke.

Back to Risk Factors

Fact Analysis

What is uterine cancer? Uterine cancer occurs when the cells in the inner lining of the uterus (womb) grow out of control. The cells clump together and form a malignant (cancerous) tumor. The uterus is part of the female reproductive system. It's about the size and shape of a pear and found inside the lower abdomen. When a woman is pregnant, the baby grows inside her uterus..

Back to Fact Analysis

How common is uterine cancer? About 36,000 American women are diagnosed with uterine cancer each year.

Back to Fact Analysis

Who is at risk of getting uterine cancer? All women can get uterine cancer, but it usually strikes postmenopausal women over age 50. And the risk quickly goes up with age. Women with a family history of uterine cancer have a higher risk. 

Back to Fact Analysis

How do you lower your risk of uterine cancer?    
  • Try to achieve and maintain a healthy weight. 
  • If you are under age 50, consider taking birth control pills.Talk with your doctor about the risks and benefits. 
  • Don't take post-menopausal hormones. But be sure to check with your doctor first!

Back to Fact Analysis

What is the screening test? There is no good screening test to find uterine cancer in its early stages. If you're concerned about uterine cancer, talk to a doctor about your risk.

Back to Fact Analysis

What are the symptoms of uterine cancer?

  • The symptoms of uterine cancer may include:
  • Abnormal vaginal bleeding
  • Abdominal cramping
  • Bleeding after sex
  • Pain in the pelvic area
Some of these symptoms may be caused by something less serious. Only a doctor can know for sure. If you have any of these symptoms, see a doctor immediately.

Back to Fact Analysis

 

Major Topics
Google
Please Rate This Page: How useful is this information for you?
. Comments:

About Us |Help| Home |Poll  |Site Map
Terms & Conditions |
Business Strategy | Disclaimer | Privacy Policy |Contact Us

All material on this website is protected by International Copyright Law © 1999-2017 by scienceoflife.com, Life Science Medical Center. Best viewed in IE5.0+ (1024X768) resolution. scienceoflife.com - Window To The Future of Medicine™